Walks in West Lancashire

Nature endures. Nature always finds its way.

As summer reached its height, we took a stroll along the West Lancashire and Sefton section of the Cheshire Lines path. Forming part of the Trans Pennine Trail, this 346km coast-to-coast route, which was once a railway line, runs from Southport to Hornsea.

It is in these fields and woods, an ever changing patchwork divided by the silvery threads of rivers and brooks, where we’ve seen owls, hares, and deer.

On this occasion, as we stood on the bridge of Downholland brook, a grey heron made an appearance along with the stealth sky pilots that are swallows, swifts and martins. Although they were going about their daily rituals, feasting on late summer’s offerings, we were treated to an avian air show like no other.

The riverbank was sweetly covered with clover and a myriad of grasses, plants and wildflowers. A common blue butterfly – a female – flitted around us before settling in the abundant green.

There is an uneasy chill on the breeze. We see how humans attempt to tame and master the land and elements, yet nature overcomes. Nature endures. Nature always finds its way. 🌿

I’m sure we’ll be back here before long, and perhaps we’ll explore the route by bicycle. That will certainly please Fen.

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Walks in Late Spring

Such a joy to be in nature’s domain, walking along quiet lanes in the late spring sunshine.

In wild green verges, butterflies and bees flit from one wildflower to the next, feasting on comfrey nectar.

Buzzards circle higher and higher, wings sun-glazed, oblivious to the tale of Icarus, while closer to earth, swallows swoop in fearless flight.

From the water’s edge, mayflies ascend with but a day of life to enjoy the gentle air.

This age-old scene of nature’s rituals and rich beauty fills me with poetry and song, and I dance along, pausing often to marvel at the miraculous.

☆~♡~☆

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Walking for Inspiration

Struggling to find ideas? Here’s what walking can do for you…

I’m not a serious or even consistently regular walker, but I do love to walk and, as a writer, I find it’s vital for my creativity. Once I’m motivated and in my rhythm, a walk takes on a life of its own, opening up my imagination and providing me with an endless stream of ideas.

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A good walk reduces mind-clutter to make room for creative reflection, curious thought or simply the pleasure of enjoying the moment. It allows me to stretch my legs and enjoy the tonic of different scenery after lengthy stints in my writer’s nest. Walking also offers a chance to escape and explore a patch of this magically diverse landscape, and I’m always excited by the prospect of discoveries with each footfall. Inspiring stuff for a curious mind!

Feeding the Imagination

I’ve done my share of bad weather walking over the years so perhaps you can forgive me for saying that, these days, I much prefer fair-weather walking. I’ve been lucky to cherry-pick such days. That said, there are pleasures and insights to be gained from being caught out in a rain shower or fighting my way against a fierce gale. All experience feeds the imagination and there’s something about embracing the elements, which brings out the drama in one’s creativity.

Tuning into Creativity

When I tackle a route, I usually cover anything from two to eight miles. That’s no great distance. After all, in the days of poet Wordsworth, William and his sister Dorothy, along with their literary companions, often walked anything between 12 and 20 miles a day – and on a regular basis. It’s no surprise that Wordsworth and the likes of ST Coleridge gained so much inspiration on their walks. Their poetry is full of nature’s magic and musings experienced while out on foot.

 

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You don’t have to walk such great distances to tune into your creativity. Even a short walk of a mile or two is beneficial. If I’m honest, I favour walks of just three to four miles. I like to vary my pace, and take time to stop, explore, reflect and devour the changing scenery.

Capturing the Moment

I’ve spent hours on the circular Rydal path in the English Lake District, stopping frequently to admire the shifting light or to watch the reflections on the Lake. It is a route of about five miles, savoured by many artists and writers past and present. I like to just `be’, and this is important for creative thinking. Moments of stillness allow you to be fully aware and capture the present moment. Like a story, walking has a certain beginning, middle and end. The imagination shifts through the landscape during a walk, and those stopping points provide ideas, which can be committed to a notebook.

Spontaneity Sparks the Imagination

Walking a familiar route is a pleasure, but it’s often the unplanned walks and newly discovered paths – the spontaneous `let’s see where this path takes us’ – that excites the neurons and teases the imagination. These particular walks offer a playground for the senses.

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I’ve discovered magical woodland glades, rocky outcrops with endless views, secluded paths where only the sedating trill of wildlife fills the air, and timeless landscapes, which leave a permanent imprint on the memory, simply by taking another unplanned path. In some cases, I’ve only walked less than a mile or so to find these little treasures.

Creativity in Motion

Sometimes, I sing when I walk (to myself of course) or recite poetry or, if I’m with willing companions, discuss the profundities of life, the universe and everything, but it’s the silent moments that are the most insightful. It’s during these times that thought deepens or I sense life’s natural rhythms flowing through me, and an idea for a story unfolds. The action of walking silently through the landscape brings clarity to the mind, and opens consciousness to a plethora of ideas and solutions. It truly is creativity in motion and I always return inspired and mind spilling over with inspiration.

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Walking is, without doubt, great exercise and a celebrated pastime for many people but, for me, it is also a vehicle that takes me right to the heart of my imagination, allowing the creative playtime that I’ve always craved since childhood. Whether it’s just being out in the fresh air or the action of moving through the landscape, thoughts are given the space needed to think creatively, and there are few activities that are so effectively inspiring.

By Carol Anne Strange

By Carol Anne Strange

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The Sentience of Light

I’ve been playing in the light, bathing in rainbow rays that seem so much more intense these days.

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Kestrel, Crow, Buzzard and Lapwing have kept me company along with the first of the season’s butterflies. Both sun and moon have occupied the afternoon’s gentle blue, and all of life’s magic manifests in the stillness of being. Springtime is on her way, here in this little corner garden of planet earth, and nature knows this. ‘Tis a time for new beginnings.

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There is something dream-like about my walks and travels of late. I feel like I’m moving without moving, noticing the transience of the moment.

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I’m constantly reminded that I’m just a visitor here – as are we all.

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Such a reminder is a gift… a message to enjoy this physical journey, as our visit is so sweetly short.

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Breathe in bliss. Capture a moment.

What is more beautiful than being present in the light, surrounded by nature?

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